The Amos Course: God’s Word to a World of Injustice (a bit of R&R for your home group)

home-group

Are you part of a home group at your church?  Looking for some resources to help explore what the Bible says about poverty and injustice?

Amos: God’s Word to a World of Injustice

R&R has produced a 6 session course on the book of Amos. No biblical book has a clearer and sharper message about injustice than Amos.  The aim of this series of small group sessions is to grapple with the challenge of Amos in today’s world.

You can access the notes for the 6 sessions below.  On each page you can download a version of the notes in MS Word to make them easier to print out and use.

How does the course work?

Each session starts with a warm up question or activity and then aims to get everyone all participants to engage with the biblical text.  Each session focuses on 1 or 2 chapters of Amos.  Also a good proportion of each session focusing on application – what does the message of Amos mean day-to-day for our church and for us personally?  To help this there is a short challenge that everyone is asked to complete before the next session.

Using the material flexibly

The studies are designed to last between 50 minutes and an hour – depending on how much discussion occurs. Please feel free to adapt the material to fit your context. We hope it will help you grapple with the challenge of Amos in a way that fits your home-group.

Keeping in touch

If you do run the course then do let us know how it went.  And we would love any feedback on making it better.

About Jon Kuhrt

Jon Kuhrt works with people affected by homelessness, offending and addictions at the West London Mission. He, his wife and three children are part of Streatham Baptist Church and he is a member of the Christians on the Left. He likes football...but loves cricket.
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2 Responses to The Amos Course: God’s Word to a World of Injustice (a bit of R&R for your home group)

  1. Andy in Germany says:

    Could I get this translated/use it as the base for a course in German?

    • Jon Kuhrt says:

      Hi Andy – ja! No problem – you might have noticed my German ancestry in my surname but that’s the extent of my language knowledge unfortunately! But of course – feel free to translate and use. We would be honoured – could be good to weave more references to Bonhoeffer and less about Lord Shaftesbury!

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