The Faithfulness Matters statement

This is the statement which sums up what this campaign is all about.  the campaign has its own website now – www.faithfulnessmatters.net

If you agree with the statement, please join the movement by sending an email to FaithfulnessMatters@gmail.com

We believe that faithfulness between people in committed relationships matters.  It matters for individuals, for families, for children and for our communities. We believe that commitment, trust and honesty are key cornerstones of a healthy society.

Because of this, we do not believe that running websites specifically focused to encourage married people to have affairs is legitimate business for a responsible company.  We do not believe anyone should make money from breaking up relationships. 

We call upon the companies engaged in running websites which encourage people to have affairs to withdraw from the partnerships involved and close these websites.

If you agree to these statement, then please send an email to FaithfulnessMatters@gmail.com with your name, your church or organisation (where relevant) and any message of support.

Faithfulness Matters want to build a visible list of people who agree with this statement so we will publish people names and messages of support.  They will of course not publish any emails addresses.

About Jon Kuhrt

Jon Kuhrt works with people affected by homelessness, offending and addictions at the West London Mission. He, his wife and three children are part of Streatham Baptist Church and he is a member of the Christians on the Left. He likes football...but loves cricket.
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3 Responses to The Faithfulness Matters statement

  1. a says:

    Hm. I agree wholeheartedly that ‘faithfulness matters’ but it’s because of that that I can’t really agree, because I fundamentally disagree with the assumption behind the statement that ‘We do not believe anyone should make money from breaking up relationships’.

    Specifically, I do not agree that any advertisement can ‘break up’ a relationship, as if the adulterer were some passive pawn of the advertister, led on to do something they would not otherwise have considered.

    The whole and full responsibility for adultery lies with the adulterer. No matter the temptation, no matter how the marriage may have soured, no matter the opportunity, they can — they must — simply say, ‘No’.

    I find it sad that companies like these can exist. But the adverts are not the cause of any marriages breaking up. They are a symptom of a society in which the primary purpose of sexual relationships is seen as providing happiness.

    I therefore cannot support the call to close the websites. Make no mistake: I want the websites to close. But the only way that that can truly happen is to return to a society where faithfulness is assumed to be the norm.

    Until that happens, there is no point in closing the websites. For every person who is unfaithful through one of these websites was unfaithful in their heart already. The websites are merely the sickness of a necrotic society, reflected back at itself.

    Faithfulness matters. It matters too much to allow the responsibility for a breach of that faithfulness to be shared, passed on, or in any way diluted by implying that a website had anything to do with it. No one is unfaithful because of a website. They are unfaithful because they allow themselves to be unfaithful, and that is the whole and the end and the tragedy of it.

  2. Pingback: Disagreeing well is good for us (far better than echo-chambers which just reinforce what we already believe) | Resistance & Renewal

  3. Pingback: Disagreeing well is good for us (far better than echo-chambers which just reinforce what we already believe) | Resistance & Renewal

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